Mar 072016
 

Illustration by Naruto Maki: http://pixiv.net/i/28390209

While the teaching of Vocaloid software in schools is something that’s been around a while, it’s not too often you see the Hatsune Miku and Vocaloid phenomena studied at universities. In particular, it is being studied at at the oldest and most well-known English university in the world: The University of Oxford.

The book is titled “The Oxford Handbook of Music and Virtuality”, and the juicy bits relating to Vocaloid can be found under part 2, “Vocaloids, Holograms, and Virtual Pop Stars”. Below are the chapter titles:

  • 6. Vocaloids and Japanese Virtual Vocal Performance: The Cultural Heritage and Technological Futures of Vocal Puppetry
    Louise H. Jackson and Mike Dines
  • 7. Hatsune Miku and Japanese Virtual Idols
    Rafal Zaborowski
  • 8. Hatsune Miku, 2.0Pac, and Beyond: Rewinding and Fast-Forwarding the Virtual Pop Star
    Thomas Conner
  • 9. “Feel Good” with Gorillaz and “Reject False Icons”: The Fantasy Worlds of the Virtual Group and Their Creators
    Shara Ramberran

As a college textbook, it’s a bit pricey if you want to purchase it (although unless you’re attending Oxford, it’s more of a novelty item). It’s $150 for a physical copy, and $120 for the full digital version. Luckily, most of it is available for free reading on Google Books, minus chapter 9 and a part of chapter 8.

Read it on Google Books → https://goo.gl/EqkXo4

A listing of the book can also be seen on Oxford University’s press site here.

Source: Vocaloid Otaku

If you regularly enjoy reading our site, consider supporting us on
About jrharbort

A Hatsune Miku fan since December 2007, jrharbort joined MikuFan.com as the Head Writer in October 2011, and enjoys sharing news with other fans around the world. You can follow him on Twitter at @jrharbort!

  • FSucka

    “The editors of this book only care about Miku because she has the music AND the image.”

    In every case, and considering your argument, then Miku shouldn’t be the focus in the study, since she doesn’t offer anything “new” in terms of image+music. Many others before and after Miku have that too.

    Gorillaz (who are twice the famous than Miku considering their trayectory and numbers, also that they aren’t limited to a niche audience) already had concerts years before Miku that mixed digital music+projections. Other vocaloids have concerts with much more advanced technollogy beyond the rear projection Miku has (IA, Tone Rion, ONA, etc.). Miku isn’t entirely virtual; she can’t genuinely talk or laugh or present a variety of emotions like, Tohoku Zunko or Yuzuki Yukari, who have EXvoices and Voiceroid technollogy.

    “For me, image is essential”

    For me too, I’m a and graphic designer, director and animator, I know how image works on people’s minds and it’s the essential part of my work.
    I like Miku because of her image too, but that being the ONLY reason to like or enjoy her is, honestly, idiotic.
    It’s like going to a restaurant and picking a plate that you know is the most shit-taste meal yet thinking it’s good because “it has a good picture in the menu”.

    And being blunt too, I’m not a weeb, I like Miku for several reasons beyond her anime avatar (which I find beautiful too!) and I don’t feel particularly annoyed if the cause of her fame is that or if the text exclusively talks about it; I’m a grown up after all, haha.

    What makes me feel annoyed is the lack of objectivity and congruency in the investigation and the very partial look of the overall text using japanese reactions to her; I already stated that is informative, but it has A LOT of wrong info regarding vocaloid and the way it has impact in today’s culture. If the chapter were called something like, dunno “Hatsune Miku and the implications of image in virtual media” or anything that has an actual relation with the content, then fine.
    But it’s called “Vocaloids and Japanese Virtual Vocal Performance”.
    They don’t talk about Vocaloid, but Miku. And make several assumptions about the Vocaloid “world” based exclusively in Miku’s niche, that is just around 40% of the whole thing Vocaloid is.

  • Brandon Zheng

    There’s way too many Vocaloids, and Miku’s the most famous. They gotta pick and choose.

    I’m not saying I only like her because she’s cute. I’m saying that she has to be cute, but that’s not enough–the music’s still has to be good too. Besides, if the music weren’t good, plenty of people would also not listen to her. But, I mean, that’s not something Miku controls, is it? That’s up to the producers.

    She’s different from Gorillaz (who someone writes about in some other section of the book, too, btw) because there’s specifically a Japanese and an anime culture aspect to her popularity. Which is why they had to address appropriation.

  • Brandon Zheng

    > It’s not sociological, it’s a technollogic advances overview.

    That’s why I said you fucked up, because there’s no way of putting this except that you’re wrong. The people who put this together were a combination of media studies people and musicians, not engineers and producers.

    >which aspect of Miku would make OXFORD STUDENTS feel more interested: the technollogy and enhancement she offers as a tool for music production, or the anime avatar she has?

    Uh, the anime stuff. I didn’t say the music wasn’t important. I said that the music is only important paired with the virtual stuff. Pianos are music. Sword Art Online is virtual. Neither of them are the topic of any of the chapters in this book because the book is only interested in when those two COME TOGETHER. Again, Miku without the anime stuff = nothing, but Miku without the music stuff ALSO equals nothing.

    Pro tip: academics don’t write about things because they’re suddenly popular. They write about them because they get popular and the ACADEMICS THEMSELVES start liking it. The people who wrote these three chapters were almost guaranteed to have grown an interest in Miku FIRST before writing about her. Writing academic papers takes work, and you can’t make it if you don’t really care about what you’re writing about.

    And the students? They’re a bunch of 18-22 year olds. Come off it with the idea that they’re these elites that aren’t like us. They’re still just a bunch of kids, many of whom love anime and vocaloids.

  • FSucka

    “They’re still just a bunch of kids, many of whom love anime and vocaloids.”
    >implying that being young is the only reason to like anime and that weebs and anime enthusiasts are a mayority.

    That’s a fallacy; the fact that your own personal circle likes anime doesn’t mean every youngster likes anime; friendly reminder that by default, otakus, weebs and wapaneses are seen as outcasts being a minority, specially between teenagers; also in Japan most otakus (lit. obsessive fan) are young adults-elders, so being young is not a prerequisite to like anime (specially outside Japan, if we consider the general bad perception west has of manganime content). And implying that they are studying the topic because they like Vocaloids is overestimating the popularity of vocaloid; Vocaloid is still niche, and it will be like that for a long time; as I said, since there’s not a boom of Vocaloid outside the niche it is now, Yamaha is already considering to stop the production of the software. In every case, the whole handbook is more centered on virtual reality as a tool for music than Vocaloid itself.

    “The people who wrote these three chapters were almost guaranteed to have grown an interest in Miku FIRST before writing about her.”
    >Implying that academics write what they want to.

    The only reason why they wrote about this particular topic it’s because is the perfect example of music+virtuality in terms of technollogy and it comes in relation to it. Not necessarily cuz they like it; there’s a difference between writers and academics; the latter are investigators of topics in need of research because of the lack of coverage in scientific/technollogic areas, not because they “like” it. Plus, it’s an Oxford Handbook: they hire professionals to investigate particular topics and complilate the info in just one book. it’s just their job.
    If the authors wrote about her is because they had to include it as a perfect example of the overall topic the book talks about, not necessarily because they -wanted- to; i.e. it’s like writing a book about Social Repercutions of Racism and, since you added Hitler’s murders into the chapters as an example it means you like Hitler and his murders?

  • FSucka

    At least we agreed in that part; exactly that’s what makes me feel annoyed about the book; it points out that the most notorious (if not, the only) reason to be attracted to Miku is her avatar, anime profile, no matter the music or the tech behind her, which are also VERY important reasons to like her, yet aren’t addresed properly in the text.

  • Brandon Zheng

    Those are important aspects of her character, but not relevant to the topic of this book. It’s like complaining that a book about French wine doesn’t talk enough about the chemistry of tannins. They’re not dismissing those things; they’re just not important for this book.

  • Brandon Zheng

    >there’s not a boom of Vocaloid outside the niche it is now, Yamaha is already considering to stop the production of the software

    There’s a huge explosion of Vocaloids. It’s just that people don’t buy the software, because most Vocaloid fans aren’t music producers. I like listening to classical music. I also don’t own a violin or a piano. You should look at all the sold out tickets for the recent Hatsune Miku concert tour here in the United States.

    “>Implying that academics write what they want to.”

    That’s exactly what I’m saying. Academics write what they want to write about. When you get into grad school, you spend about two years taking classes. You choose a dissertation advisor who studies the kind of stuff you’re interested in. Then, you tell your advisor what you want to write your PhD dissertation about, and they help you along that route. Once you get your PhD, you look for a job with a university. While you’re trying to get tenure, you then try to write a book on the same kinds of things you did research on when you were getting your PhD.

    > it’s an Oxford Handbook: they hire professionals to investigate particular topics and complilate the info in just one book. it’s just their job.

    You’re wrong. I literally can’t argue against this, because that’s like writing an essay on why “1+1=3” is wrong. I can’t do it, because you’re actually wrong. That’s not how it works.

    > The only reason why they wrote about this particular topic it’s because is the perfect example of music+virtuality in terms of technollogy and it comes in relation to it. Not necessarily cuz they like it

    When an editor decides to make a handbook, they write a bunch of prominent people and ask them to write about the subject. So the editor asked people to write about “music and virtuality.” That’s it.

    The people who turned in essays on Miku did it because they WANTED TO WRITE ABOUT MIKU. That’s how it works. I know this because I know professors, I talk to them, and I’m pretty intimately familiar with the process. This isn’t primary school; you write about what you’re interested in!

    If you don’t know this basic fact about how academic books work, then I’m not sure what to say, except…did you even go to university?

    >That’s a fallacy; the fact that your own personal circle likes anime doesn’t mean every youngster likes anime; friendly reminder that by default, otakus, weebs and wapaneses are seen as outcasts being a minority, specially between teenagers; also in Japan most otakus (lit. obsessive fan) are young adults-elders, so being young is not a prerequisite to like anime (specially outside Japan, if we consider the general bad perception west has of manganime content).

    What. What the fuck does this even mean? This doesn’t make any sense. I didn’t say that EVERY young person likes anime, I just said that a lot of young people like anime. And I didn’t say anything about older anime fans in Japan. This paragraph doesn’t make any sense. Also, it’s terribly written.
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    TL;DR: I can tell that English isn’t your first language. So basically, you didn’t understand anything in the book, so you thought it said a bunch of things that it didn’t. Then, you slandered what is actually an excellently written text, and now everyone else on this website thinks that Oxford’s out to get Miku fans or something.

    Nice job, asshat.

  • FSucka

    I finished listening it.
    The music is really amazing, reminds me of late 80s-early 90s rock-hard rock productions; the voice of Miku is used as a texture in some of them, like in “The First” and “Pack a Bowl”, and some others have a beautiful edition like in “Stay Dry” (which I loved) I also liked the heavy sounds of “Winchester” and “Hold On”, those guitars sound grungy and cool!
    The only one I disliked (more like the one I liked the less) was the cover of “Hello”; it needs probably more tweaks in the voice, since sounds kinda flat (try checking the rock edition cover by MangoSiRyan using Cyber Diva, it’s a good point of comparison to improve the expression)

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    Wow, that is kind if amazing. “Hello” was the one song I didn’t do. My ten year old daughter did that one for a school project. She used CyberDIVA and also plays the piano – which is all the parts there are to that one. Really interesting how that one stuck out to you from the rest! Good ear on the rest, also! I wrote them back in the 1990’s when I used to be in a band called “Nerado Blacl” – hence this albums title “The Nerado Black Sessions”! Spot on! “The First” used Miku purely as an instrument because it never had lyrics. She actually sings “Pack a bowl” repeatedly on “Pack-A-Bowl” – it used to be a jam we’d play while someone packed a bowl…. mostly a joke tune, but fun to jam. I was going to write a solo for that, but then decided to pack a bowl and wing a one off and keep whatever happened to keep it authentic to the spirit of the piece. I hope you hear the differences in her execution on songs like “Anarchy” vs ones like “Restless Afternoon” – thanks for checking them out! I hope there was one you really like in there!

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    been listening to MangoSiRyan – right away noticed he tried to depend on Vocaloid for any pitch bending – I learned to avoid that early in. Any note that needs to pitchbend, I pick a single note for it to stay on in Volcaloid, render it, and bend it later in Melodyne – much better results.

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    Hello (Rock Version) is pretty awesome though!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBViy2m3wBc

  • FSucka

    *they didn’t seem’d important to the investigator.
    >Funny thing, I have an oil painting book that also explains in a whole chapter the complex production of oils and the different results materials offer, including the elaboration of the canvas fabric in different regions, before full entering into the technique; that’s what you could call -REAL- research.

  • FSucka

    Whoa, someone got triggered here.

    Considering the velocity of your answer and since it seems you can’t argue like a decent person, not being able to explain yourself and your point and needing to insult to mark your arguments, l think I’ll stop here; it would be insulting to myself and the readers of this debate to continue talking and enter into your little inmature kaboom. Once you grow up and got some experience about technollogy beyond what you think, and learn how to properly argument, I will allow you to debate with me once again.

    PD: Obviously, English isn’t my first language; actually I speak four languages and I’m studying a fifth one (mandarin); sadly I need more practice, of course. I worked at an editorial for seven years,and we printed a number of handbooks for several universities around the country and I have three thesis about semiothics, graphic design and mascot development, one of them already in Google Books.

    Protip, next time try not to insult.
    See ya! And have a nice day.

  • Brandon Zheng

    My “triggering” is over the fact that Sankaku Complex wrote an article about this textbook using your comment as their only source. Obviously, SC is not a credible site, its readers not very quality people, and its articles not at all of any consequence. Still, the very fact that a single bum comment could shape sizeable opinion of any sort over this book was extremely distressing, and I wanted to let it be known for posterity that that wasn’t the only voice out there.

    We were obviously not arguing. I was recording in print just how much you didn’t know what you were talking about, and you were proving that further with each post.

    Also, for the record, some people on the internet are also Navy SEALs with 300 confirmed kills.

  • Brandon Zheng

    One book does not a counterexample make. I’m going to assume it’s a trade book, not an academic one, which would explain its more general focus. Well, since I “don’t know how to properly argument,” it doesn’t seem like you’ll be responding again. Oh well.

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    Interesting read, but in the last portions, I need to agree with FSucka on bring the conversation to a close if Brandon Zheng insists on the logical fallacy of Ad Hominem.

    https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/ad-hominem

    Attacking their character, or implying your day job, have no bearing on the subject at hand, no matter how strongly implied.

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    Fact Checking:

    “many MORE like her because she’s a cute virtual green-haired anime girl who sings”

    – She has blue hair by default, although depictions exist in all other colors, her “natural” color is blue.

    =====================

    “you don’t talk about rocket and tanks in a book on diplomacy and foreign relations.”

    – Rockets and tanks were created specifically to affect diplomatic relations. Weapons and War are the ultimate endgame to which diplomacy tries to avoid, and with which nations elevate their relative status to one another in the UN, and how the US becomes recognized as a political super power. Any political text neglecting these factors would be a very comically misguided book.

    =====================

    “What you’re interested in is the nitty-gritty staring at a computer screen, looping beats, manipulating the raw sound into a musical piece of art”

    – This is not a depiction reflecting an understanding of how music is created. In the studio, we have very many virtual tools at our disposal, and many are cheaper and more reliable than the physical versions that they are simulations of, and when done right, sound and react exactly the same as the physical model. We have IK Multimedia doing physics model engines to expertly and reliable emulate tube technology, and apply that in making compressors, EQ’s, Tape emulation, Guitar Amplifiers, etc. We have Native Instruments making virtualizations of nearly every keyboard, piano, organ, etc, ever created. I could go on literally for days on what is out there – but the point is that these tools are called “Virtual Instruments” because they exist digitally. Vocaloid, paired with Hatsune Miku voice packs (or any other Vocaloid voice pack) constitutes a Virtual Instrument. She is not considered a “Virtual Pop-Star” because of her appearance. The visual side is anime, later becoming 3D anime that was animated and made into live holography, facilitated by projection to a large mosquito net. The visual side is the anime component. What you hear is the basis of her “Virtual” status, hence why that aspect of her technology is relevant in a discussion about her – especially when the very context is “MUSIC and VIRTUALITY” – it wasn’t a topic about the history of “animated” pop-stars (such as Max Headroom, The Muppets, etc. all of whom had real humans performing while something animated or puppeteer-ed was the visual overlay presented to the audience), as there were many who were not created as a computer generated Virtual Instrument. Academically speaking, addressing them is a separate subject. Addressing that element in Miku is secondary, but relevant as it is a part of what she is, but not the part that affords her such special unique standing in the history of pop-stars. Further, discussing her impact on fans is a sociological study, not a technological one.

    =====================

    “(Btw I can’t believe a virtuality book author can’t differenciate hologram from projection, Miku is a projection, not a hologram on stage)”

    – Projection techniques like this are the only current form of “Holography” we have that can function in a live scenario like this at present, that I am aware of. You are correct that this is not true “Holography”, but the technique is often cited as a form of it. Last I checked, they currently use three projectors calibrated to the same area, One for color, one for gray-scale contrast layer, and one for shadows. It may be different now, my info was from 2013.

    =====================

    “I don’t think you’re the kind of person they’re trying to target with this book.”

    – the logical fallacy here is Special Pleading. https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/special-pleading

    =====================

    “That’s why I said you fucked up, because there’s no way of putting this except that you’re wrong. The people who put this together were a combination of media studies people and musicians, not engineers and producers.”

    – These subsets of people are the same people. They may not all play to the same strengths in each area, but most musicians do home recordings. This means they need a baseline understanding of engineering to put that home studio together and address all the driver and latency issues that will occur before it all operates correctly. This means they are producing their own recordings at their PC’s and come to a minimum baseline of proficiency before they end up with a recording they can show people. They often have to be their own marketing body, as well. As careers evolve, and they excel in certain areas over others, the career path may see them evolve into recording musicians, managers, audio engineers, or programmers that are responsible for products like Vocaloid. These are all things that were created by people whom were musicians first. It is demonstrably prerequisite in the work accomplished. For example, I have a joint major in Jazz and Political Science, and also an honors in Philosophy. I have a home studio. I am my own talent for my albums (thank you for checking my latest out featuring Hatsune Miku, by the way). I have programmed since I was 4. I worked for Microsoft for 5 years between 2003 and 2008. I am currently support for 104 companies, including government domains and nuclear installations. I created my own version of LAME to use when encoding MP3’s. I’ve written books on Audio Engineering. I’m in a unique position to evaluate music software, and that affords me much insight into WHY it was made the way that it was, leaving me often with praise for good decision making I can relate to and appreciate. That said, I don’t feel I’m a “white rhino”, as the expression goes. I think in this day and age, there are a LOT of musicians that had to diversify as I had to. Hence, I do not think creating those subsets of people holds a lot of weight. Happy to have other musicians weigh in on the matter, though, as statistics do not exist to qualify my expectations.

    =====================

    “Uh, the anime stuff. I didn’t say the music wasn’t important. I said that the music is only important paired with the virtual stuff. Pianos are music. Sword Art Online is virtual.”

    – Please refer above to the talk of digital virtual instruments, and how Miku is one. THIS is why she is virtual. She is a computer generated MUSICAL INSTRUMENT – that was one of the first to also have a marketing team give her a visual element through which to characterize and market her.

    =====================

    “Pro tip: academics don’t write about things because they’re suddenly popular. They write about them because they get popular and the ACADEMICS THEMSELVES start liking it.”

    – Contradiction Laden Statement. Things get popular because they are liked, therefore “popular” and “liked” are functional equivalents in the statement. Therefore, you say that Academics don’t study things because they like it, but because they like it. That makes no sense. Logical fallacy observed.

    =====================

    ” Yamaha is already considering to stop the production of the software.”

    – I’ve been in touch with Yamaha regarding my album and Vocaloid penetration into the North American markets. They are in no way considering stopping the product – they have bog plans both in the public sectors, and in the robotics sector. I can attest to that first hand. Remember, Vocaloid began as a voice for Japanese robotics research – then they got to a point where they could also make it sing, which opened up secondary markets. All the fame surrounding Hatsune Miku, etc – is what they consider a very healthy SECONDARY market. It does so well, and most hear so little on the robotics front, that it is easily perceived as the PRIMARY market.

    =====================

    “…most Vocaloid fans aren’t music producers.”

    – Bullshit. I know most of the fans I personally know happen to create music themselves – actually – after reflecting – they all do… Either way, my version, your version, statistics do not exist that I am aware of and I would happily like to see a source.

    =====================

    “it’s an Oxford Handbook: they hire professionals to investigate particular topics and complilate [sic] the info in just one book. it’s just their job.”

    – Part wrong. While it is true that if one were engaged to write a thesis or partake in an academic study on a topic, that topic is typically determined by the person doing the undertaking, this published work falls drastically short of the expectations we would have made upon peer review prior to publication – a process of which does employ professionals paid to fact check and verify before the University will risk having their name associated with the work. My thesis was on Liberalism and Native Rights. I’ve been through the process. My conclusions and facts were verified, and yet still considered too controversial to be endorsed. This book on Vocaloids seems to be rushed with little to no peer review, in my personal estimation. This has Oxford’s name applied to it, which is why this is so surprising.

    =====================

    “When an editor decides to make a handbook, they write a bunch of prominent people and ask them to write about the subject. So the editor asked people to write about “music and virtuality.” That’s it.”

    – That is so much BS I’m afraid to poke at it with a stick in case it explodes. That, in no way, reflects how the process works. That comment AND context about “music and virtuality”, as presented, has both no merit nor valid context. See above on Miku being a VIRTUAL INSTRUMENT.

    =====================

    “The people who turned in essays on Miku did it because they WANTED TO WRITE ABOUT MIKU. That’s how it works. I know this because I know professors, I talk to them,”

    – This is kind of like saying “People are Vegan because they wanted to be Vegan. I know Karate, because I spoke to Bruce Lee”. It suffers from the logical fallacy “Composition/division” https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/composition-division – while it is true (possibly) that people who did in fact turn in essays on Miku did so because they wanted to write about Miku (possibly, since we don’t know if the scenario exists where they were assigned to do so, and did do so, while not really wanting to) – it does not lend credence to you knowing how the process works, nor does having spoken to a professor. In fact, the latter portion also suffers the logical fallacy of being anecdotal (https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/anecdotal).

    =====================

    “If you don’t know this basic fact about how academic books work, then I’m not sure what to say, except…did you even go to university?”

    – Speculative, presumptive, and purely Ad Hominem.

    =====================

    “What. What the fuck does this even mean? This doesn’t make any sense. I didn’t say that EVERY young person likes anime, I just said that a lot of young people like anime. And I didn’t say anything about older anime fans in Japan. This paragraph doesn’t make any sense. Also, it’s terribly written.”

    Your logical fallacy here is “Personal Incredulity” https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/personal-incredulity

    =====================

    “Nice job, asshat.”

    – Ad Hominem. https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/ad-hominem

    =====================

    ” Obviously, SC is not a credible site, its readers not very quality people, and its articles not at all of any consequence”

    – Ad Hominem. https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/ad-hominem

    =====================

    “We were obviously not arguing”

    – Your logical fallacy is “Every Schoolboy Knows” http://www.speaklikeapro.co.uk/Logical_fallacies.htm – typically expressed in large appeals with phrases loaded with terms like “Obviously” so to market the idea that something was obviously known, when in fact it was not. Arguing is precisely what I’ve been analyzing. You partook in it.

    =====================

    “Also, for the record, some people on the internet are also Navy SEALs with 300 confirmed kills”

    – a special bland on “Might Is Right”, “Ad Hominem”, and “Superiority Complex” in the logical fallacy here.

  • Vagenda Adnegav

    Ad Hominem

  • FSucka

    Goddammit Vagenda, you did it amazingly.
    Honestly I don’t like to see argues as a battle of win-lose; you always learn something from discussions so no matter who is right or wrong, knownledge is might so everyone wins!

  • FSucka

    I like that you usually avoid the skirly section of Miku English’ voicebank (which is not her intended range, dunno why people never reads the specifications of the package) so she ends up sounding quite natural in terms of timbre. Her english isn’t very clear for reasons we already know but some sections are sweet and smooth so the song ends up being delectable to the ears.
    Good gob there! I find it perfect just as it is since fits perfectly with the general color and mood of the song, but as a listener (I’m not a musician so my knownledge isn’t accurate, but I’ve been listening every-language vocaloids for 8 years everyday) I could suggest to make some slight alterations to the vocal pitch (I personally don’t like Melodyne, it gives a perfect and accurate pitch of course, but it ends up being particularly strained, so the ear instantly notices that there’s something weird there).
    Those slight modifications, i.e. adding small legatos to initial notes or final notes will make the performance more realistic and impromptu; after all, human voice isn’t perfect. Not even the most talented human singer of the world could sing with a perfect pitch in every note.

    But that’s just me, since I like vocaloids to sound as realistic as possible within their own technollogic and particular capabilities. It’s your style at the end, and it’s quite cool!

  • izzyisozaki

    How the fuck does appropriation even come into the picture if the Japanese willingly export it?

  • Brandon Zheng

    Appropriation is not necessarily a bad thing. It just means when you use another culture’s art or items or whatever in forming your own thing. It CAN be bad, but it’s not always.

    They used the word, like twice or something in the book and someone lost their shit. I haven’t visited this page in months, so I forget the specifics. I’m just here telling everyone to calm down and put the pitchforks away because like I said, “appropriation” isn’t being used negatively here.

  • izzyisozaki

    Oh, okay.

  • Pingback: “初音未来与Vocaloid现象”成为牛津大学课文内容! - VOCALOID News Network()

  • Pingback: Virtual Pop Star, Vocaloid, Dan Perkembangan IPTEK dalam Permusikan di Indonesia – Hanya Sebuah Blog Biasa()